The Most Important Thing

April 4, 2018

 
Re-reading the previous articles on this site, I find that the main theme most of the stories lead to is "our longing to come home," "the going home to the house of the Father," "going to heaven," "being united with God in His heavenly home," "the glory of the resurrection."
 
All these concepts refer to the same thing: the salvation of our souls when our temporal life on earth ends . . . and our own resurrection when the world ends and Christ comes again.
 
Consciously or subconsciously, we all want to be happy in life. This is what drives our actions during our waking hours (or sleeping hours, for some). This is the goal of our efforts and activities, that occupies most of our time.
 
Anything that is opposite to this we consciously or subconsciously shun, or avoid if we can: like pain, sickness, suffering, loneliness. However, we find out that we cannot avoid certain pains, illness, suffering because most of these are beyond our control. They just come and afflict us. Then we have to contend with them and this often makes us unhappy, unless we know how to deal with them.
 
In the face of what life offers and gives us, we are led or compelled to make sense out of it all. When people try to live good moral lives but are afflicted with severe pain, setbacks, and apparent abandonment by God, some say: "Why do bad things happen to good people?" We do not necessarily find an immediate, satisfactory answer.
 
But there is an answer.
 
God wants us to experience that in the midst of the goods of this life, there is something more that is in store for us. In many cases, such experiences are "tender calls" for us to long for Him, to yearn to be with Him when our time on earth is over. "Wake up calls," "tender whispers," "beckonings" are manifestations and means of God showing His love for us.
 
The poet Francis Thompson wrote about God as "The Hound of Heaven," Who tirelessly pursues us.
 
But these pursuit, calls, whispers, and beckonings do not necessarily or always elicit a response.
 
Jim Caviezel, who portrayed Jesus in the movie "The Passion of the Christ," and now portrays the role of the Gospel-writer Luke in the movie, "Paul, Apostle of Christ," said he chooses films which can "bring the most souls back to God."
 
From the filming of "The Passion" Caviezel said God made him feel that "our Lord is so alone — His creatures do not love Him. . . . He could force Himself on us, but would that be love? I don't think so. I'm so blessed because I get to convey those stories, but do it in a way ... that I know can bring the most souls back to Him, even those that don't believe.”
 
To a gathering of youth he said: “I want you to have the courage to step into this pagan world and shamelessly express your faith in public . . . God is calling each one of us – each one of you – to do great things,” he said, as he warned against failing to respond, dismissing God’s call.
 
In its own little way, this blog site aims to be a public expression of faith, an instrument of evangelization, the spreading God's truth and love to whoever reads or will read its stories and articles.
 
The theme may be the same, or recurring, in most pages. The truth it expresses may be simple, or it may be hard to adopt in life. But it is the same truth, presented to us over and over again by Scriptures and the Church: the truth of God's immense love for us, and His plan, implemented in time by His Son Jesus Christ. This plan is to bring us home to heaven where He dwells in union with the Father and the Holy Spirit, and with Mary, the angels and saints.
 
Salvation. Resurrection. Union with God for all eternity.
 
Without achieving it, this life would be, to say the least, a tragedy.#
 
 

 

 

 

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